Brigham Young University Provo began in 1862 when Warren Dusenberry started a school in Cluff Hall at the northeast corner of East and North, paying $50 per month rent and building the desks for the school himself. In 1865, Dusenberry left the school to enter private business and to serve as a missionary for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He returned to Provo and started a second school with his brother in a different building. The second school grew and the brothers relocated to the Lewis Building on Center and West Street. When enrollment reached 300, the school became part of the University of Deseret, which was based in Salt Lake City, and known as the Timpanogos branch.

In 1875, Brigham Young, the President of the Church of Christ of Latter-day Saints, purchased the Lewis Building along with the school that was housed there, using personal funds. He severed ties with the University of Deseret and christened the school "Brigham Young Academy." Warren Dusenberry remained as principal until Young's selection for the position, Karl Maeser, a German immigrant, arrived. In 1884, a fire destroyed the Lewis Building and students were required to attend classes in three separate locations before moving to a warehouse on University Avenue. Classes were held in the warehouse until 1892 when the BY Academy Building was completed. Maeser was promoted to the position of president, a position he eventually resigned when he took a position that would oversee the entire Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints education system.

During this period, Brigham Young Academy was more like a high school than an institute of higher learning. When Benjamin Cluff, Jr. replaced Maeser, he began implementing changes to the school based on his own experiences as a student at the University of Michigan. College students were separated from high school students, providing those at college level more advanced materials. During this era, the school was entirely supported by members of the community until it was sponsored officially by the Church of Christ of Latter-day Saints in 1896.

In 1903, Brigham Young Academy was dissolved and replaced with two institutions, Brigham Young High School and Brigham Young University. The new university purchased 17 acres of land from the city of Provo and it was believed that the church would build a temple on the property, earning it the name "Temple Hill." There was some opposition to the purchase of the land for an institute of higher learning, but citizens soon rallied behind the decision. Controversy existed, however, as differences of opinion on curriculum developed among members of the Board of Trustees. During this era, many described the school as more of a religious seminary than a university.

When Franklin S. Harris took over as president of the university, he reorganized the college into a true university, eliminating all remnants of the former academy. He also achieved accreditation status or the school. He was replaced by Howard S. McDonald who struggled to work with the Board of Trustees. It was during his tenure, however, that enrollment at Brigham Young University grew by nearly five times as soldiers returning from World War II took advantage of the G.I. Bill. This required significant expansion in order to accommodate the new students, prompting McDonald to purchase part of an Air Force Base in Ogden to house some of the students.

Today, more than 25,000 students attend Brigham Young University Provo and the school has produced almost 445,000 alumni.

Brigham Young University Accreditation Details

Brigham Young University is accredited by the Northwest Commission on Colleges and Universities. Accreditation indicates that the college has met or exceeded criteria set forth by the accrediting agency that demonstrates excellence in education. In addition, the following industry-specific organizations accredit programs offered through Brigham Young:

  • Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Accreditation Council for Education in Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, Inc., Applied Science Accreditation Commission
  • Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, Inc., Computing Accreditation Commission
  • Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, Inc., Engineering Accreditation Commission
  • Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, Inc., Engineering Technology Accreditation Commission
  • Accrediting Council for Education in Journalism and Mass Communications
  • American Alliance of Museums
  • American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy, Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy Education
  • American Bar Association, Council on the Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar
  • American Psychological Association, Commission on Accreditation
  • American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, Council on Academic Accreditation in Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology
  • Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business
  • Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education
  • Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education
  • Council on Accreditation of Parks, Recreation, Tourism and Related Professions
  • Council on Education for Public Health
  • Council on Social Work Education
  • Facility Management Accreditation Commission, International Facility Management Association Foundation
  • National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences
  • National Association of Schools of Art and Design, Commission on Accreditation
  • National Association of Schools of Dance, Commission on Accreditation
  • National Association of Schools of Music, Commission on Accreditation
  • National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration
  • National Association of Schools of Theatre, Commission on Accreditation
  • Professional Landcare Network
  • Teacher Education Accreditation Council, Accreditation Committee
  • Teacher Education Accreditation Council, by the Inquiry Brief Commission of the Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation

Brigham Young University Provo Application Requirements

Students who have fewer than 24 semester or 36 quarter hours in college credit must submit student information along with their school selection/scholarships form. Students must provide an ecclesiastical endorsement and a seminary or institute evaluation. Students must also provide official high school transcripts and detail any extra-curricular activities. A student essay si also required. ACT and SAT scores are not required.

Students with more than 24 semester or 36 quarter hours in college credit must submit student information and school selection/scholarships forms. In addition, they must provide the Ecclesiastical endorsement, seminary or institute evaluation and the student essay. Official transcripts from each college and university attended must be submitted as well.

Graduate students must complete an application and sign the Honor Code Commitment as well as the Ecclesiastical Endorsement. Students who are members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints must also submit to an interview with a bishop and stake president. Non-church members must obtain an ecclesiastical endorsement from their local religious leader and submit to a phone interview with a BYU chaplain. Students must provide official transcripts from each college or university attended. Each department may have specific requirements for admission so graduate students are encouraged to speak to an admissions counselor before applying.

Brigham Young University Provo Tuition and Financial Aid

Full-time undergraduate tuition at Brigham Young University Provo is $276 per credit hour for Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints members and $552 for non-members. Graduate tuition is $393 per credit hour for church members and $786 per credit hour for non-members. Some graduate programs may have slightly higher tuition rates.

Financial Aid is available for all students. In order to be eligible for aid, students must complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Financial aid is available in the form of loans, grants, scholarships and work-study programs.

Brigham Young University Provo Degree(s) Available

Applied Social Psychology

The Applied Social Psychology PhD at Brigham Young University Provo is designed for students who wish to enter research and teaching positions. Students are provided with a real-world view of social psychology. Graduates have found positions in research, teaching or a combination of both. Students develop knowledge and skills in program development and evaluation as well as statistical or methodological consulting. Students develop an understanding of the legal aspects of psychology as well as industrial and organizational impacts on mental health.

Cognitive and Behavioral Neuroscience, Psychology PhD

The Cognitive and Behavioral Neuroscience doctorate degree at Brigham Young University Provo emphasizes research and teaching with a focus on integration of psychology and neuroscience. Graduates often enter fields that include academic research, teaching or a combination of both. Students develop an understanding of neuroimaging or consulting. The program does not prepare students for a career in Clinical Neuropsychology which requires a degree in clinical psychology and licensure.

Developmental Psychology, Psychology PhD

The doctorate degree in Developmental Psychology focuses on human growth throughout the lifespan. Students develop an understanding of the three domains of life, which include biological, social and cognitive development. The program is for students who wish to train in research and teaching with a focus on discovering and applying knowledge to real-world issues. The program is non-clinical, so students will not obtain clinical licensure.

Clinical Psychology PhD

The Clinical Psychology PhD at Brigham Young University adheres to a scientist-practitioner model. Students develop an understanding of cognitive and humanistic perspectives that can affect human interactions. Students are prepared to become excellent generalist clinical psychologists with the ability to pursue academic, research or clinical careers. Students may meet the criteria for licensure upon completion of the program.

Students who obtain advanced degrees from Brigham Young University Provo have become world-renowned in their field. Brigham Young University Provo continues a long-standing tradition of honor in education through its affiliation with the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and a commitment to excellence in education.