Becoming a project manager can provide a diverse array of opportunities, but you may wonder specifically about the types of jobs for someone with a Master's in Project Management. Project management professionals can find work in engineering, technology, construction, manufacturing and telecommunications. While they may work in different industries, these professionals have one main function in common: They oversee all facets of a project. These skilled managerial organizers carry a great deal of responsibility within organizations and hold positions that allow them to utilize their skills in complex ways. Read on to learn more about the types of positions available for these professionals.

Related Resource: 10 Most Affordable Master's in Project Management Online 2018

Project Manager

We'll start with the job of project manager, as it's probably the one most people are familiar with. These experts are team leaders who are in charge of a project. The project manager reports to the client who has requested the particular project, and he or she is responsible for its oversight from start to finish. Some specific responsibilities might include establishing deadlines, directing team members, designating budgets and scheduling work.

Senior Project Manager

Sometimes there is a senior project manager that is responsible for programs or multiple projects that are requested simultaneously or are highly dependent on each other for a successful outcome. They coordinate the work of each specific project manager, ensuring that tasks of primary importance are completed on schedule and under budget. They may also be responsible for communicating to executive leadership on program status and company impacts.

Assistant Project Manager

Because the job of project manager is one of such responsibility, it makes sense to have an assistant project manager on hand to help with ensuring all tasks remain on track. This is an ideal entry-level position for those with less experience. This person is usually responsible for a handful of specific duties that help to then prove their readiness to take on additional roles, potentially moving on to become project manager.

Project Coordinator

Of jobs that require a Master's in Project Management, this one is great for those who enjoy paperwork and organization. Project coordinators may have less hands-on experience than other positions within the field, as this is often an entry position. According to this Career Outlook by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, some of their duties include scheduling meetings, developing reports and providing assistance to the management team. This help can come in many forms. One of the main tasks of a project coordinator is to keep everyone on the team appraised of important information and to coordinate communication among members.

Project Scheduler

Some types of projects are extensive and complex. When there are a large number of team members and strict guidelines to which adherence is crucial, it helps to have a project scheduler on the job. This person is responsible for, as the title implies, keeping all of the various aspects of the project's schedule in line. Members of the management team will communicate important information to this professional, and he or she will need to ensure that all other team members stay on track. This can be assisted through special software, but it does require excellent organizational skills from the project scheduler.

There are a wide variety of duties that fall under the larger umbrella of project management. These are some of the more common jobs available with a Master's in Project Management.